David Lynch’s “Lost Highway” as the Painting of a Lost Mind

  The camera is focused on a highway, its yellow stripes are passing by rapidly, and Bowie’s song I'm Deranged is playing; a highly suggestive introduction into the film. In the opening shot, we see a man smoking a cigarette, by carefully following the narrative throughout the film, we can recollect that he is in … Continue reading David Lynch’s “Lost Highway” as the Painting of a Lost Mind

Silence (Martin Scorsese, 2016) “The Dark Night of the Soul”

Earlier this year, I wrote an article about this very film, “Last Breaths of Christendom in the Land of the Rising Son”, emphasizing the role of the Japanese state (Tokugawa Shogunate) and the Hobbesian reading which implies that the state proscribes the teachings and religions practiced by the populace; in this case the state religion … Continue reading Silence (Martin Scorsese, 2016) “The Dark Night of the Soul”

Freedom or Security? – MCU’s “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”

Chris Evans, the actor who impersonated Captain America, said the following words regarding his character's transition from the WWII era to the modern day: “It's not so much about his shock with [technology]... It's more about the societal differences. He's gone from the '40s to today; he comes from a world where people were a … Continue reading Freedom or Security? – MCU’s “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”

The Advent of “Joker” – A Pathological Struggle for Recognition

Editor’s Note: Since the film is in the cinemas at the moment while I am writing this article, I will not reveal any details about the film's plot, and I will certainly not write a value judgment of the film. Whether the film is enjoyable or not in the final verdict is a matter of … Continue reading The Advent of “Joker” – A Pathological Struggle for Recognition

Dionysiac Union with Art in Aronofsky’s “Black Swan”

Aronofsky’s Black Swan follows the ballet dancer Nina, who gets a part in the production of Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake. She is fragile, innocent, fearful and pure, but lacks the feel for playing the Black Swan, while she is a perfect cast for the White Swan. In the performances of Tchaikovsky’s ballet, the same ballerina sometimes … Continue reading Dionysiac Union with Art in Aronofsky’s “Black Swan”

Confessions of Britain’s Most Violent Criminal – Refn’s “Bronson”

In the final lines of the chapter “The spectacle of the scaffold”, in his book Discipline and Punish, Michel Foucault writes about a great shift in the portrayal of criminals in fiction, which took place in the 19th century: “We are far removed indeed from those accounts of the life and misdeeds of the criminal … Continue reading Confessions of Britain’s Most Violent Criminal – Refn’s “Bronson”

Dissolved into Truth’s Fire: Alex Garland’s “Annihilation”

For me, [Annihilation] was a film about the nature of self-destruction… it was about an observation I made, which is that everybody appears to be self-destructive. Some people are very obviously self-destructive because they’re addicted to heroin or alcohol… Other people are very comfortable in their own skin, and they’ve got a fantastic job and … Continue reading Dissolved into Truth’s Fire: Alex Garland’s “Annihilation”