In Stanley Kubrick’s Words: “3 Most Consistent and Original Contemporary Directors”

I believe Ingmar Bergman, Vittorio De Sica, and Federico Fellini are the only three filmmakers in the world who are not just artistic opportunists. By this I mean they don’t just sit and wait for a good story to come along and then make it. They have a point of view which is expressed over… Continue reading In Stanley Kubrick’s Words: “3 Most Consistent and Original Contemporary Directors”

In Klaus Kinski’s Words… “Great Actor As A Violinist”

If I was doing a movie that was really bad, I always realized that I had to play my role as good as possible when the camera was on me. The fact that the movie was total shit did not bother me. For example, let's say that there's a hand that is used to playing… Continue reading In Klaus Kinski’s Words… “Great Actor As A Violinist”

Dark City (Alex Proyas, 1998) “What Makes Us Human?”

For this essay, I chose the title “What makes us human?”, stereotypical for writing about science-fiction films for instance Blade Runner, although I believe that Ridley Scott’s film does not deal with that particular question, but this is a topic for another essay. Be it as it may, Dark City does deal with this question,… Continue reading Dark City (Alex Proyas, 1998) “What Makes Us Human?”

Uncharted Territory: 5 Films To Be Watched As A Nietzschean Test of Will

When Nietzsche’s philosophy is taken into account, the phrase “test of will” cannot be found in the original texts of the philosopher, but it appears in the interpretations. To be more specific, in the interpretation of Cormac McCarthy’s novel No Country for Old Men, put on the silver screen by the legendary Coen Brothers. Chigurh,… Continue reading Uncharted Territory: 5 Films To Be Watched As A Nietzschean Test of Will

In Bruno Ganz’s Words… “In Memoriam: An Angel Embodying A Demon”

[On Hitler: Downfall (2004)] What people need is for Hitler to actually represent evil itself. But what is evil itself? That means nothing to me. I have to perform a living human being (…) We know how to judge Hitler. We don’t need another film that condemns him. We already know where we stand on… Continue reading In Bruno Ganz’s Words… “In Memoriam: An Angel Embodying A Demon”

In Friedrich Nietzsche’s Words: “Why Do We Like Comedies?”

"Perhaps I know best why man alone laughs: he alone suffers so deeply that he had to invent laughter. The unhappiest and most melancholy man is, as fitting, the most cheerful." Friedrich Nietzsche, The Will to Power ≈ 91 On German Pessimism This Nietzsche’s thought can be seen as a bridge between his youthful stage… Continue reading In Friedrich Nietzsche’s Words: “Why Do We Like Comedies?”

Perfect Blue (Satoshi Kon, 1997) “I Am Who I Am!”

Satoshi Kon is arguably, alongside Hayao Miyazaki, the most important Japanese director of animated films. Perfect Blue is his first film and this directorial debut can be compared to David Lynch’s Eraserhead due to sheer boldness and far-reaching artistic vision. The film begins with a show staged for children featuring a Japanese version of Power… Continue reading Perfect Blue (Satoshi Kon, 1997) “I Am Who I Am!”

In Akira Kurosawa’s Words: Film Director As A Military Commander

A film director has to convince a great number of people to follow him and work with him. I often say, although I am certainly not a militarist, that if you compare the production unit to an army, the script is the battle flag and the director is the commander in the front line. From… Continue reading In Akira Kurosawa’s Words: Film Director As A Military Commander

In Sigmund Freud’s Words: “Rewatching Movies = A Child at Play?”

“In the play of children we seem to arrive at the conclusion that the child repeats even the unpleasant experiences because through his own activity he gains a far more thorough mastery of the strong impression than was possible by mere passive experience. Every fresh repetition seems to strenghten this mastery for which the child… Continue reading In Sigmund Freud’s Words: “Rewatching Movies = A Child at Play?”

Annihilation (Alex Garland, 2018) “Thanatic Journey into the Unconscious”

“For me, [Annihilation] was a film about the nature of self-destruction… it was about an observation I made, which is that everybody appears to be self-destructive. Some people are very obviously self-destructive because they’re addicted to heroin or alcohol… Other people are very comfortable in their own skin, and they’ve got a fantastic job and… Continue reading Annihilation (Alex Garland, 2018) “Thanatic Journey into the Unconscious”