Through A Glass Darkly (Ingmar Bergman, 1961) “Vision of God As A Spider”

In the thirteenth chapter of the first epistle to the Corinthians, St Paul says: “For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then I shall know even as I also am known”. In these St Paul’s words, practically the whole film Through the Glass … Continue reading Through A Glass Darkly (Ingmar Bergman, 1961) “Vision of God As A Spider”

In Joel Coen’s Words: “Poking Fun at Characters”

I guess there is a certain amount of poking fun at certain characters, but that’s because there is something amusing about them or about the way they behave, so I guess you can say that’s poking  fun at the character. But the character is your own invention, so who cares? Joel Coen Coen’s most elaborated … Continue reading In Joel Coen’s Words: “Poking Fun at Characters”

Akira (Katsuhiro Otomo, 1988) “Destruction as the Cause of Becoming”

I found Akira, a landmark animated film which introduced the Japanese animated films to the Western audience, to be an eclectic mess. During the first and even the second watching of the film it seemed that way. Later, as I managed to put the pieces together (and some parts of the film are fragments of … Continue reading Akira (Katsuhiro Otomo, 1988) “Destruction as the Cause of Becoming”

In Yasujirô Ozu’s Words: “The Change of Seasons”

I tried to show the collapse of the Japanese family system through showing children growing up. Yasujirô Ozu Ozu’s post-war work, during the time when he made his most memorable films, is characterized by the same theme which is presented over and over. In his own words, he presents the “collapse of the Japanese family … Continue reading In Yasujirô Ozu’s Words: “The Change of Seasons”

5 Melancholic Films Which Can Inspire You Into Creativity (Melancolia II)

For the second part of this list, I chose the title Melancolia II,  which is also the title of the second Dürer’s engraving depicting a melancholic angel. This allusion to Dürer is only for stylistic purposes, since I chose another painting to depict a melancholic setting, Pieter Bruegel’s Hunters In the Snow. I chose this … Continue reading 5 Melancholic Films Which Can Inspire You Into Creativity (Melancolia II)

5 Melancholic Films Which Can Inspire You Into Creativity (Melancolia I)

While interpreting Albert Dürer’s engraving Melancolia I, professor of art history Bonnie Noble writes: “Dürer’s intellect, introspection, and unrelenting perfectionism may have driven him to a state of melancholia—what is now known as depression. Dürer’s famed Melencolia I engraving of 1514 has been called the artist’s psychological self-portrait, and indeed the image does convey the terrible struggle … Continue reading 5 Melancholic Films Which Can Inspire You Into Creativity (Melancolia I)

Bronson (Nicolas Winding Refn, 2008) “Confessions of Britain’s Most Violent Criminal”

In the final lines of the chapter “The spectacle of the scaffold”, in his book Discipline and Punish, Michel Foucault writes about a great shift in the portrayal of criminals in fiction, which took place in the 19th century: “We are far removed indeed from those accounts of the life and misdeeds of the criminal … Continue reading Bronson (Nicolas Winding Refn, 2008) “Confessions of Britain’s Most Violent Criminal”

In Theodor Adorno’s Words “Caught In An Illusory Moment (at Cinema)”

Spiritual nobility of soul and the sense of fraternity have melted together into slogans for the workforce. But every individual product is levelled down in itself as well. There are no longer any real conflicts to be seen.[1] They are replaced by the surrogate of shocks and sensations which seem to erupt from without and … Continue reading In Theodor Adorno’s Words “Caught In An Illusory Moment (at Cinema)”

In Stanley Kubrick’s Words: “3 Most Consistent and Original Contemporary Directors”

I believe Ingmar Bergman, Vittorio De Sica, and Federico Fellini are the only three filmmakers in the world who are not just artistic opportunists. By this I mean they don’t just sit and wait for a good story to come along and then make it. They have a point of view which is expressed over … Continue reading In Stanley Kubrick’s Words: “3 Most Consistent and Original Contemporary Directors”

In Klaus Kinski’s Words… “Great Actor As A Violinist”

If I was doing a movie that was really bad, I always realized that I had to play my role as good as possible when the camera was on me. The fact that the movie was total shit did not bother me. For example, let's say that there's a hand that is used to playing … Continue reading In Klaus Kinski’s Words… “Great Actor As A Violinist”