In Werner Herzog’s Words: The Origins of Cinema

“Film is not analysis, it is the agitation of mind; cinema comes from the country fair and the circus, not from art and academicism.“ ̶  Werner Herzog Herzog's understanding of the origins of cinema in the country fair and circus, not the academia, cannot be stressed enough. When he was making his Aguirre, the Wrath … Continue reading In Werner Herzog’s Words: The Origins of Cinema

In Alejandro Jodorowsky’s Words: The Danger of Symbolism in Imagery

“What I am trying to do when I use symbols is to awaken in your unconscious some reaction. I am very conscious of what I am using because symbols can be very dangerous. When we use normal language we can defend ourselves because our society is a linguistic society, a semantic society. But when you … Continue reading In Alejandro Jodorowsky’s Words: The Danger of Symbolism in Imagery

In Robert Bresson’s Words: Life as a Stage and Life as a Dream

Two types of films: those that employ the resources of the theater (actors, direction etc...) and use the camera in order to reproduce; those that employ the resources of cinematography and use the camera to create. Robert Bresson, Notes on the Cinematographer Robert Bresson, a French director who gave us many masterpieces, Au Hasard Balthazar, … Continue reading In Robert Bresson’s Words: Life as a Stage and Life as a Dream

In Federico Fellini’s Words: Movies = Dreams

Talking about dreams is like talking about movies, since the cinema uses the language of dreams; years can pass in a second, and you can hop from one place to another. It's a language made of image. And in the real cinema, every object and every light means something, as in a dream. Federico Fellini … Continue reading In Federico Fellini’s Words: Movies = Dreams

In Michael Haneke’s Words: Confrontation with the Unknown

“I like the multiplicity of books, because each book is different in the mind of each reader. It's the same with this film - if 300 people are in a cinema watching it, they will all see a different film, so in a way there are thousands of different versions of "Caché (Hidden)". The point … Continue reading In Michael Haneke’s Words: Confrontation with the Unknown

In Béla Tarr’s Words: Evolution in Understanding of Art, Life and Cinema

“At the beginning of my career, I had a lot of social anger. I just wanted to tell you how fucked up the society is. This was the beginning. Afterwards, I began to understand that the problems were not only social; they are deeper. I thought they were only ontological and when I understood more … Continue reading In Béla Tarr’s Words: Evolution in Understanding of Art, Life and Cinema

In David Lynch’s Words: The Idea Tells You Everything

“The idea tells you everything. Lots of times I get ideas, I fall in love with them. Those ones you fall in love with are really special ideas. And, in some ways, I always say, when something's abstract, the abstractions are hard to put into words unless you're a poet. These ideas you somehow know. … Continue reading In David Lynch’s Words: The Idea Tells You Everything

In Martin Scorsese’s Words: Cinema and Spirituality

  When we talk about personal expression I’m often reminded of [Elia] Kazan’s film America America – the story of his uncle’s journey from Anitolia to America; the story of so many immigrants who came to this country from a very, very foreign land. I kind of identified with it and was very moved by it. Actually, … Continue reading In Martin Scorsese’s Words: Cinema and Spirituality

In Paul Verhoeven’s Words: A Leap into the Unknown

Verhoeven compared making RoboCop with making Elle and once said that the experience was a “leap into the unknown”. He elaborates it in an interview: So you go to an unknown part of the world where you don't know the people, and that's frightening. But also, at the same time, if you do it, it turns … Continue reading In Paul Verhoeven’s Words: A Leap into the Unknown

In Joel Coen’s Words: Poking Fun at Characters

I guess there is a certain amount of poking fun at certain characters, but that’s because there is something amusing about them or about the way they behave, so I guess you can say that’s poking  fun at the character. But the character is your own invention, so who cares? Joel Coen Coen’s most elaborated … Continue reading In Joel Coen’s Words: Poking Fun at Characters