In Alejandro Jodorowsky’s Words: The Danger of Symbolism in Imagery

“What I am trying to do when I use symbols is to awaken in your unconscious some reaction. I am very conscious of what I am using because symbols can be very dangerous. When we use normal language we can defend ourselves because our society is a linguistic society, a semantic society. But when you … Continue reading In Alejandro Jodorowsky’s Words: The Danger of Symbolism in Imagery

In Robert Bresson’s Words: Life as a Stage and Life as a Dream

Two types of films: those that employ the resources of the theater (actors, direction etc...) and use the camera in order to reproduce; those that employ the resources of cinematography and use the camera to create. Robert Bresson, Notes on the Cinematographer Robert Bresson, a French director who gave us many masterpieces, Au Hasard Balthazar, … Continue reading In Robert Bresson’s Words: Life as a Stage and Life as a Dream

In Federico Fellini’s Words: Movies = Dreams

Talking about dreams is like talking about movies, since the cinema uses the language of dreams; years can pass in a second, and you can hop from one place to another. It's a language made of image. And in the real cinema, every object and every light means something, as in a dream. Federico Fellini … Continue reading In Federico Fellini’s Words: Movies = Dreams

In Michael Haneke’s Words: Confrontation with the Unknown

“I like the multiplicity of books, because each book is different in the mind of each reader. It's the same with this film - if 300 people are in a cinema watching it, they will all see a different film, so in a way there are thousands of different versions of "Caché (Hidden)". The point … Continue reading In Michael Haneke’s Words: Confrontation with the Unknown

In Béla Tarr’s Words: Evolution in Understanding of Art, Life and Cinema

“At the beginning of my career, I had a lot of social anger. I just wanted to tell you how fucked up the society is. This was the beginning. Afterwards, I began to understand that the problems were not only social; they are deeper. I thought they were only ontological and when I understood more … Continue reading In Béla Tarr’s Words: Evolution in Understanding of Art, Life and Cinema

In David Lynch’s Words: The Idea Tells You Everything

“The idea tells you everything. Lots of times I get ideas, I fall in love with them. Those ones you fall in love with are really special ideas. And, in some ways, I always say, when something's abstract, the abstractions are hard to put into words unless you're a poet. These ideas you somehow know. … Continue reading In David Lynch’s Words: The Idea Tells You Everything

In Martin Scorsese’s Words “Cinema and Spirituality”

  When we talk about personal expression I’m often reminded of [Elia] Kazan’s film America America – the story of his uncle’s journey from Anitolia to America; the story of so many immigrants who came to this country from a very, very foreign land. I kind of identified with it and was very moved by it. Actually, … Continue reading In Martin Scorsese’s Words “Cinema and Spirituality”

In Paul Verhoeven’s Words: A Leap into the Unknown

Verhoeven compared making RoboCop with making Elle and once said that the experience was a “leap into the unknown”. He elaborates it in an interview: So you go to an unknown part of the world where you don't know the people, and that's frightening. But also, at the same time, if you do it, it turns … Continue reading In Paul Verhoeven’s Words: A Leap into the Unknown

In Joel Coen’s Words: Poking Fun at Characters

I guess there is a certain amount of poking fun at certain characters, but that’s because there is something amusing about them or about the way they behave, so I guess you can say that’s poking  fun at the character. But the character is your own invention, so who cares? Joel Coen Coen’s most elaborated … Continue reading In Joel Coen’s Words: Poking Fun at Characters

In Yasujirô Ozu’s Words: The Change of Seasons

I tried to show the collapse of the Japanese family system through showing children growing up. Yasujirô Ozu Ozu’s post-war work, during the time when he made his most memorable films, is characterized by the same theme which is presented over and over. In his own words, he presents the “collapse of the Japanese family … Continue reading In Yasujirô Ozu’s Words: The Change of Seasons