Game of Thrones Season 7 Overview Episodes 3-5 “Mad King’s Daughter?”

 Episode 3 – Queen’s Justice I have already written about episodes 1 & 2, in the article "Land and Sea", and in the third episode of Season 7 pieces on the chessboard are positioned in such a way that the Queen (Daenerys) is checking the King (Jon). He arrives at Dragonstone at his own will,… Continue reading Game of Thrones Season 7 Overview Episodes 3-5 “Mad King’s Daughter?”

Bronson (Nicolas Winding Refn, 2008) “Confessions of Britain’s Most Violent Criminal”

In the final lines of the chapter “The spectacle of the scaffold”, in his book Discipline and Punish, Michel Foucault writes about a great shift in the portrayal of criminals in fiction, which took place in the 19th century: “We are far removed indeed from those accounts of the life and misdeeds of the criminal… Continue reading Bronson (Nicolas Winding Refn, 2008) “Confessions of Britain’s Most Violent Criminal”

In Stanley Kubrick’s Words: “3 Most Consistent and Original Contemporary Directors”

I believe Ingmar Bergman, Vittorio De Sica, and Federico Fellini are the only three filmmakers in the world who are not just artistic opportunists. By this I mean they don’t just sit and wait for a good story to come along and then make it. They have a point of view which is expressed over… Continue reading In Stanley Kubrick’s Words: “3 Most Consistent and Original Contemporary Directors”

Uncharted Territory: 5 Films To Be Watched As A Nietzschean Test of Will

When Nietzsche’s philosophy is taken into account, the phrase “test of will” cannot be found in the original texts of the philosopher, but it appears in the interpretations. To be more specific, in the interpretation of Cormac McCarthy’s novel No Country for Old Men, put on the silver screen by the legendary Coen Brothers. Chigurh,… Continue reading Uncharted Territory: 5 Films To Be Watched As A Nietzschean Test of Will

A History of Violence (David Cronenberg, 2005) “A Veiled Body”

We question a country’s self-mythology. Perfect town and perfect family are – like Westerners – part of America’s mythology, involving notions of past innocence and naïveté. But is it possible for innocence to exist while something heinous transpires elsewhere? David Cronenberg In David Cronenberg’s A History of Violence something heinous transpires underneath the presentation of… Continue reading A History of Violence (David Cronenberg, 2005) “A Veiled Body”

Youth (Paolo Sorrentino, 2015) “Fragments of Life’s Evening “

7To the poet, to the philosopher, to the saint, all things are friendly and sacred, all events profitable, all days holy, all men divine. Ralph Waldo Emerson   We might add that this applies to the filmmakers like Paolo Sorrentino as well. Sorretino portrays the holiness of days passing and the divine in men with… Continue reading Youth (Paolo Sorrentino, 2015) “Fragments of Life’s Evening “

One More Time With Feeling (Andrew Dominik, 2016) “Nick Cave Speaking the Unspeakable”

  William Faulkner once wrote: Memory believes before knowing remembers. Believes longer than recollects, longer than knowing even wonders. These words, from the novel Light in August, have the quality of a prose poem. Their meaning eludes me, just like the understanding of this documentary eludes me. Its elusion is associated with its nature, the articulation… Continue reading One More Time With Feeling (Andrew Dominik, 2016) “Nick Cave Speaking the Unspeakable”

Death In Venice (Luchino Visconti, 1971) “Beauty Amidst Decay”

Luchino Visconti’s Death In Venice is an adaptation of Thomas Mann’s novel; it follows Gustav von Aschenbach (Dirk Bogarde), a composer who, due to ill health, comes to Venice. The film explores the encounter of true beauty amidst the decay – Venice is struck down by a plague toward the end of the film. The… Continue reading Death In Venice (Luchino Visconti, 1971) “Beauty Amidst Decay”