5 Melancholic Films Which Can Inspire You Into Creativity (Melancolia II)

For the second part of this list, I chose the title Melancolia II,  which is also the title of the second Dürer’s engraving depicting a melancholic angel. This allusion to Dürer is only for stylistic purposes, since I chose another painting to depict a melancholic setting, Pieter Bruegel’s Hunters In the Snow. I chose this … Continue reading 5 Melancholic Films Which Can Inspire You Into Creativity (Melancolia II)

5 Melancholic Films Which Can Inspire You Into Creativity (Melancolia I)

While interpreting Albert Dürer’s engraving Melancolia I, professor of art history Bonnie Noble writes: “Dürer’s intellect, introspection, and unrelenting perfectionism may have driven him to a state of melancholia—what is now known as depression. Dürer’s famed MelencoliaI engraving of 1514 has been called the artist’s psychological self-portrait, and indeed the image does convey the terrible struggle of … Continue reading 5 Melancholic Films Which Can Inspire You Into Creativity (Melancolia I)

Bronson (Nicolas Winding Refn, 2008) “Confessions of Britain’s Most Violent Criminal”

In the final lines of the chapter “The spectacle of the scaffold”, in his book Discipline and Punish, Michel Foucault writes about a great shift in the portrayal of criminals in fiction, which took place in the 19th century: “We are far removed indeed from those accounts of the life and misdeeds of the criminal … Continue reading Bronson (Nicolas Winding Refn, 2008) “Confessions of Britain’s Most Violent Criminal”

In Stanley Kubrick’s Words… “3 Most Consistent and Original Contemporary Directors”

I believe Ingmar Bergman, Vittorio De Sica, and Federico Fellini are the only three filmmakers in the world who are not just artistic opportunists. By this I mean they don’t just sit and wait for a good story to come along and then make it. They have a point of view which is expressed over … Continue reading In Stanley Kubrick’s Words… “3 Most Consistent and Original Contemporary Directors”

In Klaus Kinski’s Words… “Great Actor As A Violinist”

If I was doing a movie that was really bad, I always realized that I had to play my role as good as possible when the camera was on me. The fact that the movie was total shit did not bother me. For example, let's say that there's a hand that is used to playing … Continue reading In Klaus Kinski’s Words… “Great Actor As A Violinist”

In Bruno Ganz’s Words… “In Memoriam: An Angel Embodying A Demon”

[On Hitler: Downfall (2004)] What people need is for Hitler to actually represent evil itself. But what is evil itself? That means nothing to me. I have to perform a living human being (…) We know how to judge Hitler. We don’t need another film that condemns him. We already know where we stand on … Continue reading In Bruno Ganz’s Words… “In Memoriam: An Angel Embodying A Demon”

In Akira Kurosawa’s Words: “Film Director as A Military Commander”

A film director has to convince a great number of people to follow him and work with him. I often say, although I am certainly not a militarist, that if you compare the production unit to an army, the script is the battle flag and the director is the commander in the front line. From … Continue reading In Akira Kurosawa’s Words: “Film Director as A Military Commander”

In Andrei Tarkovsky’s Words: “Russia’s Michelangelo and Tyranny of the Spirit”

An artist never works under ideal conditions. If they existed, his work wouldn’t exist, for the artist does not live in a vacuum. Some sort of pressure must exist. The artist exists because the world is not perfect. Art would be useless if the world were perfect, as man wouldn’t look for harmony but would … Continue reading In Andrei Tarkovsky’s Words: “Russia’s Michelangelo and Tyranny of the Spirit”

Silence (Martin Scorsese, 2016) “Last Breaths of Christendom In the Land of the Rising Son”

The first European Christian missionaries landing in Japan… found their hosts totally unprepared for the message of salvation they brought. Not indifferent however. On the contrary, their preaching... though it was radically at odds with native beliefs, it was warmly received… Baptismal waters flowed. Japan might have gone Christian. But it was not to be. … Continue reading Silence (Martin Scorsese, 2016) “Last Breaths of Christendom In the Land of the Rising Son”

In Wong Kar-wai’s Words “Film Genre As A Uniform”

I never had a problem with genre because a genre actually is like a uniform - you put yourself into a certain uniform. But if you dress up in a police officer's uniform, it doesn't mean that you are an officer; it can mean something else. But this is the starting point, and the best … Continue reading In Wong Kar-wai’s Words “Film Genre As A Uniform”