5 Melancholic Films Which Can Inspire You Into Creativity (Melancolia II)

For the second part of this list, I chose the title Melancolia II,  which is also the title of the second Dürer’s engraving depicting a melancholic angel. This allusion to Dürer is only for stylistic purposes, since I chose another painting to depict a melancholic setting, Pieter Bruegel’s Hunters In the Snow. I chose this … Continue reading 5 Melancholic Films Which Can Inspire You Into Creativity (Melancolia II)

5 Melancholic Films Which Can Inspire You Into Creativity (Melancolia I)

While interpreting Albert Dürer’s engraving Melancolia I, professor of art history Bonnie Noble writes: “Dürer’s intellect, introspection, and unrelenting perfectionism may have driven him to a state of melancholia—what is now known as depression. Dürer’s famed MelencoliaI engraving of 1514 has been called the artist’s psychological self-portrait, and indeed the image does convey the terrible struggle of … Continue reading 5 Melancholic Films Which Can Inspire You Into Creativity (Melancolia I)

Bronson (Nicolas Winding Refn, 2008) “Confessions of Britain’s Most Violent Criminal”

In the final lines of the chapter “The spectacle of the scaffold”, in his book Discipline and Punish, Michel Foucault writes about a great shift in the portrayal of criminals in fiction, which took place in the 19th century: “We are far removed indeed from those accounts of the life and misdeeds of the criminal … Continue reading Bronson (Nicolas Winding Refn, 2008) “Confessions of Britain’s Most Violent Criminal”

In Theodor Adorno’s Words “Caught In An Illusory Moment (at Cinema)”

Spiritual nobility of soul and the sense of fraternity have melted together into slogans for the workforce. But every individual product is levelled down in itself as well. There are no longer any real conflicts to be seen.[1] They are replaced by the surrogate of shocks and sensations which seem to erupt from without and … Continue reading In Theodor Adorno’s Words “Caught In An Illusory Moment (at Cinema)”

Dark City (Alex Proyas, 1998) “What Makes Us Human?”

For this essay, I chose the title “What makes us human?”, stereotypical for writing about science-fiction films for instance Blade Runner, although I believe that Ridley Scott’s film does not deal with that particular question, but this is a topic for another essay. Be it as it may, Dark City does deal with this question, … Continue reading Dark City (Alex Proyas, 1998) “What Makes Us Human?”

Uncharted Territory: 5 Films To Be Watched As A Nietzschean Test of Will

When Nietzsche’s philosophy is taken into account, the phrase “test of will” cannot be found in the original texts of the philosopher, but it appears in the interpretations. To be more specific, in the interpretation of Cormac McCarthy’s novel No Country for Old Men, put on the silver screen by the legendary Coen Brothers. Chigurh, … Continue reading Uncharted Territory: 5 Films To Be Watched As A Nietzschean Test of Will

In Bruno Ganz’s Words… “In Memoriam: An Angel Embodying A Demon”

[On Hitler: Downfall (2004)] What people need is for Hitler to actually represent evil itself. But what is evil itself? That means nothing to me. I have to perform a living human being (…) We know how to judge Hitler. We don’t need another film that condemns him. We already know where we stand on … Continue reading In Bruno Ganz’s Words… “In Memoriam: An Angel Embodying A Demon”

In Friedrich Nietzsche’s Words: “Why Do We Like Comedies?”

"Perhaps I know best why man alone laughs: he alone suffers so deeply that he had to invent laughter. The unhappiest and most melancholy man is, as fitting, the most cheerful." Friedrich Nietzsche, The Will to Power ≈ 91 On German Pessimism This Nietzsche’s thought can be seen as a bridge between his youthful stage … Continue reading In Friedrich Nietzsche’s Words: “Why Do We Like Comedies?”

Annihilation (Alex Garland, 2018) “Thanatic Journey into the Unconscious”

“For me, [Annihilation] was a film about the nature of self-destruction… it was about an observation I made, which is that everybody appears to be self-destructive. Some people are very obviously self-destructive because they’re addicted to heroin or alcohol… Other people are very comfortable in their own skin, and they’ve got a fantastic job and … Continue reading Annihilation (Alex Garland, 2018) “Thanatic Journey into the Unconscious”

In Andrei Tarkovsky’s Words: “Russia’s Michelangelo and Tyranny of the Spirit”

An artist never works under ideal conditions. If they existed, his work wouldn’t exist, for the artist does not live in a vacuum. Some sort of pressure must exist. The artist exists because the world is not perfect. Art would be useless if the world were perfect, as man wouldn’t look for harmony but would … Continue reading In Andrei Tarkovsky’s Words: “Russia’s Michelangelo and Tyranny of the Spirit”