Bronson (Nicolas Winding Refn, 2008) “Confessions of Britain’s Most Violent Criminal”

In the final lines of the chapter “The spectacle of the scaffold”, in his book Discipline and Punish, Michel Foucault writes about a great shift in the portrayal of criminals in fiction, which took place in the 19th century: “We are far removed indeed from those accounts of the life and misdeeds of the criminal… Continue reading Bronson (Nicolas Winding Refn, 2008) “Confessions of Britain’s Most Violent Criminal”

In Stanley Kubrick’s Words: “3 Most Consistent and Original Contemporary Directors”

I believe Ingmar Bergman, Vittorio De Sica, and Federico Fellini are the only three filmmakers in the world who are not just artistic opportunists. By this I mean they don’t just sit and wait for a good story to come along and then make it. They have a point of view which is expressed over… Continue reading In Stanley Kubrick’s Words: “3 Most Consistent and Original Contemporary Directors”

Uncharted Territory: 5 Films To Be Watched As A Nietzschean Test of Will

When Nietzsche’s philosophy is taken into account, the phrase “test of will” cannot be found in the original texts of the philosopher, but it appears in the interpretations. To be more specific, in the interpretation of Cormac McCarthy’s novel No Country for Old Men, put on the silver screen by the legendary Coen Brothers. Chigurh,… Continue reading Uncharted Territory: 5 Films To Be Watched As A Nietzschean Test of Will

In Gustave Le Bon’s Words “Cinema and Crowd Psychology”

„Crowds being only capable of thinking in images are only to be impressed by images. It is only images that terrify or attract them and become motives of action. For this reason theatrical representations[1], in which the image is shown in its most clearly visible shape, always have an enormous influence on crowds. Bread and… Continue reading In Gustave Le Bon’s Words “Cinema and Crowd Psychology”