Chastity and Carnality Shot in Monochrome: Pawlikowski’s “Ida”

  Pawlikowski once said that “Ida doesn’t set out to explain history. That’s not what it’s about. The story is focused on very concrete and complex characters who are full of humanity with all its paradoxes. They’re not pawns used to illustrate some version of history or an ideology.” I find this to be immensely … Continue reading Chastity and Carnality Shot in Monochrome: Pawlikowski’s “Ida”

Reunions on Christmas Eve in Satoshi Kon’s “Tokyo Godfathers”

Satoshi Kon's wonderful anime depicts the Christmas Eve of three homeless bums (self-proclaimed) who listen to a public sermon and watch a play celebrating the birth of Christ, so they can eat afterwards. One of them, Gin, says: “Joy to the world, food has come”. Soon, they find a baby in the trash, and the … Continue reading Reunions on Christmas Eve in Satoshi Kon’s “Tokyo Godfathers”

In David Lynch’s Words: The Idea Tells You Everything

“The idea tells you everything. Lots of times I get ideas, I fall in love with them. Those ones you fall in love with are really special ideas. And, in some ways, I always say, when something's abstract, the abstractions are hard to put into words unless you're a poet. These ideas you somehow know. … Continue reading In David Lynch’s Words: The Idea Tells You Everything

Silence (Martin Scorsese, 2016) “The Dark Night of the Soul”

Earlier this year, I wrote an article about this very film, “Last Breaths of Christendom in the Land of the Rising Son”, emphasizing the role of the Japanese state (Tokugawa Shogunate) and the Hobbesian reading which implies that the state proscribes the teachings and religions practiced by the populace; in this case the state religion … Continue reading Silence (Martin Scorsese, 2016) “The Dark Night of the Soul”

Vision of God as a Spider: Bergman’s “Through a Glass Darkly”

In the thirteenth chapter of the first epistle to the Corinthians, St Paul says: “For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then I shall know even as I also am known”. In these St Paul’s words, practically the whole film Through the Glass … Continue reading Vision of God as a Spider: Bergman’s “Through a Glass Darkly”

What Makes us Human? – the Enigma of “Dark City”

For this essay, I chose the title “What makes us human?”, stereotypical for writing about science-fiction films for instance Blade Runner, although I believe that Ridley Scott’s film does not deal with that particular question, but this is a topic for another essay. Be it as it may, Dark City does deal with this question, … Continue reading What Makes us Human? – the Enigma of “Dark City”

Silence (Martin Scorsese, 2016) “Last Breaths of Christendom In the Land of the Rising Son”

The first European Christian missionaries landing in Japan… found their hosts totally unprepared for the message of salvation they brought. Not indifferent however. On the contrary, their preaching... though it was radically at odds with native beliefs, it was warmly received… Baptismal waters flowed. Japan might have gone Christian. But it was not to be. … Continue reading Silence (Martin Scorsese, 2016) “Last Breaths of Christendom In the Land of the Rising Son”

Never Let Me Go (2010) – Path to Completion

  Title card: The breakthrough in medical science came in 1952. Doctors could now cure the previously incurable. By 1967, life expectancy passed 100 years. Never Let Me Go is based on a novel by Kazuo Ishiguro; the film describes the dystopian reality which takes place more than 50 years before the film was made. … Continue reading Never Let Me Go (2010) – Path to Completion

Hiroshima Mon Amour (Alain Resnais, 1959) “…Nevers Mon Amour”

Hiroshima Mon Amour, directed by Alain Resnais, opens with a close-up of an arm and body amorously entangled. They are in the dark, their bodies are joined and small particles, resembling ashes or sand (as the sands of time), are falling and covering them. They are caressing and soon begin to glow, as they are … Continue reading Hiroshima Mon Amour (Alain Resnais, 1959) “…Nevers Mon Amour”