Through A Glass Darkly (Ingmar Bergman, 1961) “Vision of God As A Spider”

In the thirteenth chapter of the first epistle to the Corinthians, St Paul says: “For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then I shall know even as I also am known”. In these St Paul’s words, practically the whole film Through the Glass… Continue reading Through A Glass Darkly (Ingmar Bergman, 1961) “Vision of God As A Spider”

Annihilation (Alex Garland, 2018) “Thanatic Journey into the Unconscious”

“For me, [Annihilation] was a film about the nature of self-destruction… it was about an observation I made, which is that everybody appears to be self-destructive. Some people are very obviously self-destructive because they’re addicted to heroin or alcohol… Other people are very comfortable in their own skin, and they’ve got a fantastic job and… Continue reading Annihilation (Alex Garland, 2018) “Thanatic Journey into the Unconscious”

The Conformist (Bernardo Bertolucci, 1970) “The Psychology of Fascism”

Bernardo Bertolucci's tour de force follows a fascist agent of the secret police whose assignment is to assassinate his former university professor. Set mostly in 1938., it doesn't deal with broader societal aspects of the rulling regime, it is a study of a personality, Marcello's, who willingly serves the fascist regime. When one of the… Continue reading The Conformist (Bernardo Bertolucci, 1970) “The Psychology of Fascism”

Manchester By the Sea (Kenneth Lonergan, 2016) “A Symphony.”

A cynic would say that a razor blade should distributed alongside the DVD version of Manchester By The Sea, just like one music critic suggested regarding Leonard Cohen’s album Songs of Love and Hate. In that kind of reasoning there is a misunderstanding of the power of the melancholic experience when it is shown in… Continue reading Manchester By the Sea (Kenneth Lonergan, 2016) “A Symphony.”

Dr. Strangelove (Stanley Kubrick, 1964) “Ship of Fools”

Dr. Strangelove, based on the Peter George novel Red Alert is clearly deeply rooted in its own time; shot when Cold War was in its zenith, yet it manages to speak to us. It will speak to us as long as Doomsday Machine in the form of the nuclear arsenal possessed by the major world powers… Continue reading Dr. Strangelove (Stanley Kubrick, 1964) “Ship of Fools”